Application Deadline Extended!

Due to technical issues with the Law School Admissions Council website (www.lsac.org), which have also impacted our access to applicant information, we have decided to extend our application deadline until Wednesday, March 6, 2013.

If you encounter problems accessing our electronic application, the LSAC website, or submitting your application, please first contact LSAC Technical Support at (215) 968-1393. You may also contact us at (617) 373-2395 or lawadmissions@neu.edu and we will work with you.

We appreciate your patience and look forward to receiving your applications!

Faculty Blog: When Labor and Sports Collide

Mellon Arena, March 10, 2009

Mellon Arena, March 10, 2009 (Photo credit: AxsDeny; Courtesy of Creative Commons)

by Professor Roger Abrams
Richardson Professor of Law

As November progresses and hockey fans continue to lament the lack of a season, it’s hard not to think about labor strife in the National Hockey League. This is the third time in the short reign of Commissioner Gary Bettman that the fastest game on ice has been placed on hiatus by the owners. This dispute, like previous ones, is over a significant amount of money. The owners want a larger share of the multi-billion dollar pie baked by the athletes. However, no one can say that hockey players are not well paid. They are entertainers and, as such, are more than adequately compensated.

I teach Sports Law to upper level students at NUSL, and the course focuses on the relationships among players, unions, agents, leagues and owners. The principles of labor law and antitrust law thread throughout our class discussions. While many students take the course because we read cases involving baseball, football, basketball, hockey, and numerous other pastimes, the legal issues we address are quite challenging.

Over the past 15 years, I have been writing books and articles about the law and business of sports, learning, in the process, about the economics of the games we enjoy so much.  Much of my work focuses on social history, placing important legal issues into context. Sports mirror society in many ways. In class, we use a casebook I was invited to co-author, and I have been integrating social and business perspectives into the course materials. Students write a research paper for the course, and the best papers are often published in journals around the country.

I think you will find Northeastern University School of Law a place where you can learn the skills of lawyering in a supportive and diverse environment. From the first days of orientation until your graduation, you will be part of a community of bright men and women that is committed to excellence in legal education. You will be part of a team of winners. I hope you will consider joining us.

Attention prospective law students! Boston forum this weekend!

An interior shot of the ICA Founders Gallery f...

An interior shot of the ICA Founders Gallery facing Boston Harbor, September 2, 2007. The ICA (Institute of Contemporary Arts) is one of Boston’s many cultural riches and is located just a few minutes’ walk from the Boston Forum location. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Come and meet us this Saturday from 11 AM to 4 pm at the Law School Admissions Council
Boston Forum at the Renaissance Waterfront Hotel!

NUSL alumnae, administrators, and admissions staff will be on hand to talk with you about what makes NUSL unique. Learn more about our innovative and distinctive Cooperative Legal Education Program, our warm and diverse community, our talented faculty, and our accomplished graduates. Ask a question about our admissions process, pick up some materials, and join our mailing list.

You can just show up, though you can also register in advance.

To recap:

WHEN: Saturday, November 17, 2012, from 11 AM to 4 PM

WHERE:

Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel
606 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210

WHY: Get your questions answered and learn more about NUSL (and many other law schools)

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Coming Soon: Faculty Blog Posts!

An old joke about lawyers is that they always have three points to make. At Northeastern, our faculty fit that mold in some ways, and defy it in others. They do indeed have a lot of points to make, but those points go well beyond the law-bound musings typical of traditional academics. Sure, they publish in leading journals and write scholarly books, but here in our faculty blog, they’re more likely to talk about their pro bono representation and advocacy litigation, ground-breaking research, and engagement with the community in Boston and beyond, and, of course, their hopes and dreams for the future of the Red Sox. In these posts, our faculty share with you their interests and passions. They discuss research projects they’re knee-deep in, current events impacting people here in the US and across the globe, or might even share a fond memory from their own law school days. It is our hope that these posts will provide a window for you into the fascinating conversations happening in our halls every day, the legal questions that seemingly have no absolute answers, and power of law to shape your professional future and the clients’ lives you will impact.

So, enjoy our blogs, and don’t forget that the Early Action Application deadline is November 26! Students applying Early Action will receive a decision from the Admissions Committee by January 15. Click here to apply now.

If you’ve already submitted your application, please visit the Application Status Check to ensure that all of the required application materials have been received. For more information on applying, feel free to contact us at 617.373.2395 or lawadmissions@neu.edu.

We’re looking forward to receiving your application!

Info session tomorrow night!

Northeastern University School of Law

 

Join us for an information session for prospective students!

Wednesday, October 3, 2012, 6:00-7:30 pm

Optional tours begin at 5 pm from the Office of Admissions (101 Knowles Building)

Northeastern University School of Law

250 Dockser Hall

400 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA

See our website for more information or contact us at (617) 373-2395.

Decisions are (mostly) done.

Photographic of numerous file folders housed o...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

With the exception of a handful of applicants who have yet to complete (or just completed) their applications, all of our initial admissions decisions for fall 2012 have been issued as of Friday. (This does not include any waitlist admissions that we may engage in as the spring/summer progresses. Waitlisted applicants who indicated they would like to remain on the waitlist will be getting more information from us in thenext few weeks about the process moving forward.)All applicants should have received an email telling them to check their online status checker when decisions were issued. Those candidates who were admitted also should receive a welcome packet in the mail including a hard (paper) copy of their acceptance letter and other information, including how to deposit. As a reminder our deposit deadline is May 1.

Waitlisted applicants or applicants who were denied will not receive a paper copy of their admissions decision letter in the mail unless specifically requested. If you have a need for paper copy of a waitlist or deny decision letter, please contact the Office of Admissions at 617-373-2395.

That said, it was a difficult year this year. (And yes, I know that is cliche and many folks will dismiss what I have to say, but I am going to say it nevertheless, because it’s true). There were some absolutely great candidates in our pool, including some wonderful, impressive people who we were unable to admit at this time. Using a holistic admissions process — you know, one where we don’t use an index and read every word of every sentence of each applicant’s entire application, whether they scored a 120 on the LSAT or a 180– means that (hopefully) we get to know you well. We very much care about your lives: your professional accomplishments, personal stories, adversity you’ve overcome, your inspirations and passions. We’re very fortunate to have such an interesting, engaging, fascinating, and diverse applicant pool who span the world, more than six decades in age, endless different academic interests and professional experiences, and thousands of perspectives, ideas, and opinions. You made us laugh (usually it was a good thing), cry, and run into each other’s offices saying, “You HAVE to read this essay!”So to all of our applicants, as we conclude the main application evaluation period, I just wanted to thank you for applying.