How to Get it Done conference!

Please join us for the How to Get it Done conference on April 22! How To Get It Done: Where Legal Power Meets People Power is a student-organized conference designed to connect law students, activists, and members of the Boston community, to share knowledge, strategize together, and develop the skills needed to take action. Our programming is based on the expertise and perspectives of those who have lived experiences central to the issues we are most concerned with today. Register Here. Read on to find out more about what will be featured at the conference!

How To Get It Done will feature:

  • Panel discussions featuring activists and subject matter experts to help participants understand some of today’s pressing social issues.
  • Identity-based caucusing to create spaces for folks from similar backgrounds and identities to share their experiences and figure out how to work together well.
  • Trainings designed to help participants leave with a clear understanding of how they can organize to Get It Done.
  • A healing space for participants looking to decompress and tap into their inner selves.
  • How To Get It Done will convene at Dockser Hall on the campus of Northeastern University on April 22, 2017, beginning at 8:45am.

How To Get It Done will convene at Dockser Hall on the campus of Northeastern University on April 22, 2017, beginning at 8:45am, and is open to the public.

Challenges of the 1L Year

By Miranda ’19

If I told you 1L isn’t hard, I would be lying. Throughout 1L you are almost always battling stress, insecurities, competition, frustration and challenges. You may feel overwhelmed, inadequate, overworked and just plain confused. It can be easy to get wrapped up in negativity during 1L. A place with high demands, a new learning system, and extremely intelligent colleagues isn’t something one can process lightly. But trust me when I say that once you learn to listen to yourself over others, a surprising majority of your stress can disappear. You’ll want to learn this lesson before beginning the opportunistic adventure we call 1L.

Continue reading

Tips on Successful Networking

by Patricia ’19

When my friend recently asked me to tag along for a networking event at a Boston law firm, I immediately said yes. Shortly after, however, I started to doubt everything under the sun and began psyching myself out of going—I didn’t have the right clothes, I needed to do homework, I should just go next time, etc. But even while half of my brain was shouting “No!” the other part was encouraging me to step out of my comfort zone and do something that might be essential to my future career. I decided to go. Read on to find out what I learned:

Continue reading

Alfred Brownell’s Long Road to Northeastern

By Kevin Murray, Executive Director – Program on Human Rights and the Global Economy (PHRGE)

Alfred Brownell’s wife and children probably never expected to be living in Boston this winter. Nonetheless, in early January Mr. Brownell began work at Northeastern University School of Law (NUSL) as a Visiting Scholar affiliated with the Law School’s, Program on Human Rights and the Global Economy (PHRGE).

alfred

Alfred Brownell

A well-known human rights and environmental lawyer in his native Liberia, Brownell has always done work that raised eyebrows. He came of age in a country wracked by not one, but two bloody civil wars. He took a law degree in hopes of being able to do something to address the injustices he saw in his country.

Continue reading

Exploring Careers in Health Law

Naomi Bass, Assistant Director, Center for Co-op and Professional Advancement

What is health law? What jobs come to mind when you consider the intersection of law with the delivery of patient care and public health concerns?  These are some of the questions that I discuss with NUSL students who are interested in pursuing a career in health law.  Many NUSL students are drawn towards opportunities to do public service.  In health law, that might entail prosecuting Medicaid fraud, lobbying for the accessibility of health care, representing low-income patients through a Medical-Legal Partnership program, or advocating for improvements in environmental conditions that are harmful to public health.

Continue reading